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Record number of HCI faculty papers accepted by 2018 ACM CHI Conference

February 5, 2018

Four Department of Human-Centered Computing (HCC) faculty in the IU School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI have had a total of six full papers accepted for publication by the prestigious 2018 ACM CHI Conference.

Andrew Miller, Lynn Dombrowski, Erin Brady, and Khairi Reda, all assistant professors of human-computer interaction (HCI), will present their papers in Montreal this April, along with their students and collaborators.

The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) was founded in 1947 and is the largest and oldest international scientific and industrial computer society. ACM CHI is the premiere academic research conference in computer-human interaction (CHI), one of the largest in the ACM. More than 3,000 researchers from all over the world attend the annual conference to share the latest research innovations in the field.

Acceptance rates are highly competitive at about 20 percent, with thousands of paper submissions each year, which speaks to the top-notch quality of those accepted and their visibility in the broader research community. The School of Informatics and Computing researchers’ papers cover a range of HCI topics, from health care to accessible computing, data-driven policing, and information visualization.

Davide Bolchini, HCC professor and chair of the HCC Department, said, “We are very excited to see this collective record number of high-quality full papers from our faculty accepted at such a competitive research conference. The national visibility of the findings of these studies will continue to raise the profile of the department and the school in the community of top research scholars and institutions in the field.”

Miller’s paper, “Supporting Collaborative Health Tracking in the Hospital: Patients’ Perspectives,” examines how computing technologies could empower patients to be more involved with tracking their own health information during a hospital stay, keeping everyone—providers, patients, and their families— in the loop throughout a hospital stay, and ultimately leading to improved patient safety and post-hospital outcomes.

Dombrowski, and lead author Nitya Verma, a Ph.D. candidate in HCI, take a close look at how data collection is changing law enforcement practices. Their paper, “Challenges when Adopting Data-Driven Policing Strategies,” tackles the subject of social concerns regarding police conduct within marginalized communities. Dombrowski’s second publication, “Accountability in the Blue-Collar Data Driven Workplace,” focuses on how blue-collar workers—like electricians—generate, share, and document information and how the need for data impacts transparency, privacy, and accountability in the workplace.

Verma and Dombrowski’s publication also received an Honorable Mention Award, ranking it among the top five percent of all submissions at this year’s CHI Conference. Of the over 2500 papers accepted, only 101 were chosen for this award.

Brady and her coauthors—three HCI graduate students—examine how accessibility affects activism for persons with physical disabilities in “Slacktivists or Activists?: Identity Work in the Virtual Disability March.”  Brady’s second paper, “Smart Kitchens for People with Cognitive Impairments: A Qualitative Study of Design Requirements,” describes a study of communal kitchens used by people with cognitive impairments.

Reda’s publication, “Graphical Perception of Continuous Quantitative Maps: the Effects of Spatial Frequency and Colormap Design,” addresses the challenge of designing effective yet aesthetically pleasing maps. The paper presents a series of perceptual experiments testing how well people are able to read quantitative maps, and provides color-encoding guidelines for designers.

The Department of Human-Centered Computing at the IU School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI offers degrees at both the undergraduate and graduate level that explore the intersection of people and technology. Within the department, the Master of Science and Ph.D. programs in Human-Computer Interaction specifically teach the design, development, and evaluation of humanly usable information technologies and the user experience surrounding interactive systems.

Full papers

Sonali R. Mishra, Andrew D. Miller, Shefali Haldar, Maher Khelifi, Jordan Eschler, Rashmi G. Elera, Ari H. Pollack, and Wanda Pratt. Supporting Collaborative Health Tracking in the Hospital: Patients’ Perspectives (in press). In Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’18).

Nitya Verma and Lynn Dombrowski. Challenges when Adopting Data-Driven Policing Strategies (in press). In Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’18).

Mathias A. Valeur-Meller, Kristian Helbo Kristiansen, Lynn Dombrowski, and Naja L. Holten Møller. Accountability in the Blue-Collar Data Driven Workplace (in press). In Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’18).

Hanlin Li, Disha Bora, Sagar Salvi, and Erin Brady. Slacktivists or Activists?: Identity Work in the Virtual Disability March (in press). In Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’18).

Thomas Kosch, Pawel Woznik, Erin Brady, and Albrecht Schmidt. Smart Kitchens for People with Cognitive Impairments: A Qualitative Study of  Design Requirements (in press). In Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’18).

Khairi Reda, Pratik Nalawade, and Kate Ansah-Koi. Graphical Perception of Continuous Quantitative Maps: the Effects of Spatial Frequency and Colormap Design (in press). In Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’18).